Saturday, May 2, 2009

Pakistan Top Naat Videos By IBI

Islam: The Next American Religion?

Islam: The Next American Religion?

The U.S. began as a haven for Christian outcasts. But what religion fits our current zeitgeist? The answer may be Islam.
Americans tend to think of their country as, at the very least, a nominally Christian nation. Didn't the Pilgrims come here for freedom to practice their Christian religion? Don't Christian values of righteousness under God, and freedom, reinforce America's democratic, capitalist ideals?
True enough. But there's a new religion on the block now, one that fits the current zeitgeist nicely. It's Islam.

Zakat (Alms)

Zakat (Alms)
Zakat is one of the five pillars of Islam. It has been mentioned, along with daily Prayers (Salaat / Namaz), over seventy times in the Quran. Allah's word commanding ".....and establish regular Salaat and give regular Zakat....." are referred to in many parts of the Quran. From this we can conclude that after Salaat, Zakat is the most important act in Islam.
Just as Salaat is the most important act of worship which has to be performed bodily, so is Zakat the main act of worship which has to be performed monetarily. Those who fulfill this duty have been promised abundant reward in this world and hereafter. Whoever evades Zakat has been sternly warned in the Qur'an and Hadith of the consequences.
Linguistically, Zakat has two meanings: purification and growth. Technically, it means to purify one's possession of wealth by distributing a prescribed amount to the poor, the indigent, the slaves or captives, and the wayfarer.
There are many major benefits of giving Zakat:
It reminds Muslims of the fact that whatever wealth they may possess is due to the blessings of Allah and as such it is to be spent according to the His commands.
Zakat functions as a social security for all. Those who have enough money today pay for what they have. If they need money tomorrow they will get what is necessary to help them live decently.
Zakat payer pays his dues to Allah as an act of worship, a token of submission and an acknowledgment of gratitude. The receiver of Zakat receives it as a grant from Allah out of His bounty, a favor for which he is thankful to Allah.
Economically, Zakat is the best check against hoarding. Those who do not invest their wealth but prefer to save or hoard it would see their wealth dwindling year after year at the rate of the payable Zakat. This helps increase production and stimulates supply because it is a redistribution of income that enhances the demand by putting more real purchasing power in the hands of poor.
Zakat is obligatory upon a person if :
He or she is an adult, sane, free and Muslim.
He/she must possess wealth in excess of specified minimum (Nisaab) excluding his or her personal needs (clothing, household furniture, utensils, cars etc. are termed article of personal needs).
It should be possessed for a complete lunar year.
It should be of productive nature from which one can derive profit or benefit such as merchandise for business, gold, silver, livestock etc.
The amount of wealth which makes one liable for Zakat is called Nisaab. The Nisaab as fixed by Prophet Muhammad (P.B.U.H) is as follows:

Troy Oz.
Nisaab of cash, stock or bonds, other cash assets is the equivalent amount of Gold or Silver. Nisaab is calculated by adding up the cash value of all the assets such as gold, silver, currency etc. and if it is equal to or in excess of the minimum Nisaab as specified in the above table, the Zakat is due at the rate of 2.5%.
The payment of Zakat is compulsory on the excess wealth or effects which is equal to or exceeds the value of Nisaab, and which is possessed for a full Islamic year. If such wealth decreases during the course of the year and increases again to the value of Nisaab before the end of the year, the Zakat then must be calculated on the full amount that is possessed at the end of the year.
Gold and silver, in any form.
Cash, bank notes, stocks, bonds etc.
Merchandise for business, equal to the value of Nisaab.
Live stock.
On income derived from rental business.
To calculate Zakat on jewelry etc. one must first determine the gold or silver content and then calculate the Zakat according to current market price.
If the Gold possessed is less than 87.48 grams or if silver possessed is less then 612.36 grams, but the value of both combined is equal to or exceeds the Nisaab of either Gold or Silver, the Zakat will be due.
In the event of an article not being of pure gold or pure silver, but containing a mixture of other metals and the gold or silver content is more than the other metal, it will be regarded as gold or silver and Zakat will be due. But in the case where other metal/s is of greater quantity than either gold or silver, Zakat will not be due on this article.
For stocks (shares held in a company), Zakat is calculated based upon the current market value. As machinery, land, fixtures and fittings, furniture, buildings etc. are exempt from Zakat, one is allowed to subtract these from the total asset. This could be obtained from annual reports. For example, if one has shares worth $1000 and machinery, land etc., are worth 5% of the total asset, then deduct $50 for these assets, afterwards deduct the liabilities of the company proportionately to the percentage of shares held. Zakat must be calculated on the balance.
Zakat should be given as soon as possible after it becomes due.
All of the Zakat can be given to one person or to several persons.
A poor man cannot be paid for his work from Zakat nor can Zakat be given in payment of services, except to the people appointed by the Islamic government to collect Zakat.
Zakat will only be valid if the recipient is made the owner of that amount. If, for example, a few needy persons are fed a meal from Zakat money, then Zakat will not be fulfilled as they were not made owners of the food.
Zakat cannot be given for the construction of Masjid, Madrasah, Hospital, a well, a bridge or any other public amenity.
Zakat can be paid in kind from the same merchandise on which it is due, or alternatively, it could be paid in cash.
On any metals other than gold or silver.
Fixtures and fittings of a shop, car, trucks or any delivery vehicle etc., which is used in running business.
Diamonds, pearls, other precious or semi precious stones which are for personal use.
There is no Zakat on personal residence, household furniture, pots and pan, personal clothing, whether they are in use or not.
There is no Zakat on a person whose liabilities exceed or equal his assets. (Home Mortgage in this country is not to be counted as personal liability for the Zakat purpose).
The recipients of Zakat, according to Quran are as follows:
"Alms are for the poor and the needy, and those employed to administer (the funds); for those whose hearts have been (recently) reconciled (to truth); for those in bondage and in debt; and for the wayfarer: (Thus is it) ordained by Allah, and Allah is full of Knowledge and Wisdom." (Quran 9:60)
FUQARA: people who are poor and who possess more than their basic needs but do not possess wealth equal to Nisaab.
MASAKEEN: people who are destitute and extremely needy to the extent they are forced to beg for their daily food rations.
AL-AMILEEN: people appointed by an Islamic Government to collect Zakat.
MU-ALLAFATUL-QULUB: persons who have recently accepted Islam and are in need of basic necessities who would benefit from encouragement by Muslims which would help strengthen their faith.
AR-RIQAAB: slaves who are permitted to work for remuneration and have an agreement from their masters to purchase their freedom on payment of fixed amounts.
AL-GHAARIMEEN: persons who have a debt and do not possess any other wealth or goods with which they could repay that which they owe. It is conditional that this debt was not created for any un-Islamic purpose.
FI-SABILILLAH: persons who have to carry out an obligatory deed which has become obligatory on them and subsequently (due to loss of wealth) are unable to complete that obligation.
IBN-US-SABEEL: persons who are travelers and during the course of their journey do not possess basic necessities, though they are well to do at home. They could be given Zakat in order to fulfill travel needs to return home.
Zakat cannot be given to the descendants of Muhammad (P.B.U.H);
Zakat cannot be given to parents and grandparents. In the same manner one's children and grandchildren cannot be given Zakat. A husband and wife cannot give Zakat to each other.
Zakat contributions cannot be given to such institutions or organizations who do not give the rightful recipients possession of Zakat, but instead use Zakat funds for constructions, investment or salaries.
Allah says in the Quran:
"The parable of those who spend their wealth in the way of Allah is that of a grain of corn. It grows seven ears and each ear has hundred grains. Allah increases manifold to whom He pleases." (Quran 2:261)
It is stated in the Hadith that by giving Zakat the following benefits are derived:
Gain the pleasure of Allah.
Increase in wealth and protection from losses.
Allah's forgiveness and blessings.
Protection from the wrath of Allah and from a bad death.
A shelter on the Day of Judgment;
Security from seventy misfortunes.
Allah says in the Quran:
"And there are those who hoard gold and silver and do not spend it in the way of Allah, announce to them a most grievous penalty (when) on the Day of Judgment heat will be produced out of that wealth in the fire of Hell. Then with it they will be branded on their forehead and their flanks and backs. (It will be said to them) This is the treasure which you hoarded for yourselves, taste then the treasure that you have been hoarding." (Al-Quran 9:34-35)

Chronology of Events in the Life of Muhammad (P.B.U.H)

Chronology of Events in the Life of Muhammad (P.B.U.H)
Brief Description of the Event
Approximate DateAge of the Holy Prophet accordingto Lunar Calendar
Approximate Gregorian and Hijra dates BH=Before Hijra, AH=After Hijra
The Holy Prophet of Islam, Muhammad, peace be upon him, born an orphan His father Abdullah, may Allah be pleased with him, had died a few months before the birth of his son.
0 years
9 or 12 Rabi-ul-Awwal 52 or 53 BH April 570 or 571 AD
Hadrat Halima Sadiyya, may Allah be pleased with her, appointed wet nurse.
8 days

Return to Mecca under the care of his mother
6 Years
46 BH 577 AD
Mother, Hadrat Amina, may Allah be pleased with her, passes away
6 Years
46 BH 577 AD
Grandfather, Hadrat Abdul-Muttalib, may Allah be pleased with him, died
8 Years
44 BH 579 AD
First visit to Syria with a trading caravan 12 years 40 BH, 583 AD
12 Years
40 BH 583 AD
Pledge of Fudul to help the needy and the oppressed
15 Years
37 BH 586 AD
Second journey to Syria for trade as an agent of Hadrat Khadija, may Allah be pleased with her
25 Years
28 BH 595 AD
Marriage with Hadrat Khadija, may Allah be pleased with her
25 Years
28 BH 595 AD
Birth of a son, Hadrat Qasim (may Allah be pleased with him)
28 Years
25 BH 598 AD
Birth of his daughter, Hadrat Zainab, may Allah be pleased with her
30 Years
23 BH 600 AD
Birth of his daughter, Hadrat Ruqayya, may Allah be pleased with her
33 Years
20 BH 603 AD
Birth of his daughter, Hadrat Um-e-Kalthum, may Allah be pleased with her
34 years
19 BH 604 AD
Renovation of Ka'aba and the placement of Hajr-e-Aswad (Black Stone)
35 years
18 BH 605 AD
Birth of his daughter, Hadrat Fatima, may Allah be pleased with her
35 years
18 BH605 AD
Hadrat Jibrail bought the First Revelation in the Cave of Hira
40 Year
12 BH 610 AD
Revelation of the Holy Quran continues, Ministry of the Holy Prophet Muhammad (peace be upon him) is established. Hadrat Khadija (the wife), Hadrat Abu Bakr (the best friend), Hadrat Ali (the dearest cousin) and Hadrat Zaid (a freed slave and adopted son), may Allah be pleased with them all, accept Islam
40 Years 6 months
Friday 18 Ramadan 12 BH 14 August 610 AD
Open invitation to the people of Mecca to join Islam under Allah's command
43 Years
9 BH 614 AD
A group of Muslims emigrates to Abyssinia
46 Years
7 BH 615 AD
Blockade of Shi'b Abi-Talib
46 Years
7 BH 30 September 615 AD
Hadrat Hamza (paternal uncle) and Hadrat Umar, may Allah be pleased with them, accept Islam
46 Years
6 BH 616 AD
Hadrat Abu Talib, (beloved uncle and guardian) and only a few days later, Hadrat Khadija, the most beloved wife, may Allah be pleased with them, passed away
49 Years
Ramadan 3 BH January 619 AD
Marriage with Hadrat Sau'da, may Allah be pleased with her
49 Years
3 BH 619 AD
Marriage with Hadrat Aisha, may Allah be pleased with her
49 Years
3 BH 619 AD
Journey to Ta'if, about 40 miles from Mecca, for calling the citizens of Ta'if to Islam
49 Years
3 BH 619 AD
Journey of Mi'raj. Five daily prayers made obligatory for Muslims
50 Years
27 Rajab 2 BH 8 March 620 AD
Deputation from Medina accepts Islam
50 Years
2 BH 620 AD
First Pledge of 'Aq'ba'
52 Years
Dhul Haj, 1 BH 621 AD
Second Pledge of 'Aq'ba
52 Years
3 months BH June 622 AD
Hijra (migration) from Mecca to the cave of Thaur
52 Years
Friday 27 Safar 10 September 622
Emigration to Medina begins
52 Years
Monday 1 Rabi-ul-Awwal 13 September 622 AD
Arrival at Medina after the first Friday Prayer at Quba's Mosque
53 Years
12 Rabi-ul-Awwal 1st year AH 24 September 622 AD
Construction of the Holy Prophet's Mosque at Medina. Hadrat Bilal's call for Prayer (Adhan)
53 Years
1st year AH 622 AD
Brotherhood pacts between Ansar (Muslims from Medina) and Muhajirin (immigrants from Mecca)
53 Years
1st year AH 622 AD
Treaty with Jews of Medina
53 Years
1st year AH 622 AD
Permission to fight in self-defense is granted by Allah
53 Years
12 Safar 2 AH 14 August 623 AD
Ghazwa (Battle) of Waddan
53 Years
29 Safar 2 AH 31 August 623
Ghazwa (Battle) of Safwan
54 Years
2 AH 623 AD
Ghazwa (Battle) Dul-'Ashir
54 Years
2 AH 623 AD
Hadrat Salman Farsi, may Allah be pleased with him, accepts Islam
54 Years
2 AH 624 AD
Revelation and change of Qibla (direction to face for Formal Prayers, Salat) towards Ka'ba Fasting in the month of Ramadan becomes obligatory
54 Years
Sha'abn 2 AH February 624 AD
Ghazwa (Battle) of Badr
54 Years
12-17 Ramadan 2 AH March 8-13, 624 AD
Ghazwa (Battle) of Bani Salim
54 Years
25 Ramadan 2 AH 21 March 524 AD
Initiation of Eid-ul-Fitr and Zakat-ul-Fitr (Alms at the Eid-ul-Fitr).
54 Years
28 Ramadan / 1 Shawwal 2 AH 24/25 March 624 AD
Zakat becomes obligatory for Muslims
54 Years
Shawwal 2 AH April 624 AD
Nikah and Marriage ceremony of Hadrat Fatima, may Allah be pleased with her
54 Years
Shawwal 2 AH April 624 AD
Ghazwa (Battle) of Bani Qainuqa
54 Years
15 Shawwal 2 AH 10 April 624 AD
Ghazwa (Battle) of Sawiq
54 Years
5 Dhul-Haj 2 AH 29 May 624 AD
Ghazwa (Battle) of Ghatfan
54 Years
Muharram 3 AH July 624 AD
Ghazwa (Battle) of Bahran
55 Years
Rabi-us-Sani 3 AH October 624 AD
Marriage with Hadrat Hafsa, may Allah be pleased with her
55 Years
Shaban 3 AH January 625 AD
Ghazwa (Battle) of Uhad
55 Years
6 Shawwal 3 AH 22 March 625
Ghazwa (Battle) of Humra-ul-Asad
55 Years
8 Shawwal 3 AH 24 March 625 AD
Marriage with Hadrat Zainab Bint Khazima, may Allah be pleased with her
55 Years
Dhul-Haj 3 AH May 625 AD
Ghazwa (Battle) of Banu Nudair
56 Years
Rabi-ul-Awwal 4 AH August 625 AD
Prohibition of Drinking in Islam
56 Years
Rabi-ul-Awwal 4 AH August 625 AD
Ghazwa (Battle) of Dhatur-Riqa
56 Years
Jamadi-ul-Awwal 4 AH October 625 AD
Marriage with Hadrat Um-e-Salma, may Allah be pleased with her
56 Years
Shawwal 4 AH March 626 AD
Ghazwa (Battle) of Badru-Ukhra
56 Years
Dhul Qad 4 AH April 626
Ghazwa (Battle) of Dumatul-Jandal
57 Years
25 Rabi-ul-Awwal 5 AH
Ghazwa (Battle) of Banu Mustalaq Nikah with Hadrat Jawariya bint Harith, may Allah be pleased with her
57 Years
3 Shaban 5 AH 28 December 626 AD
Marriage with Hadrat Zainab bint Hajash, may Allah be pleased with her
57 Years
Shawwal 5 AH February 627 AD
Revelation for Hijab, rules of modesty
57 Years
1 Dhi Qa'd 5 AH 24 March 627 AD
Ghazwa (Battle) of Ahzab or Khandaq (Ditch)
57 Years
8 Dhi Qa'd 5 AH 31 March 627 AD
Ghazwa (Battle) of Bani Quraiza
57 Years
Dhul-Haj 5 AH April 627 AD
Ghazwa (Battle) of Bani Lahyan
57 Years
1 Rabi-ul-Awwal 6 AH 21 July 627 AD
Ghazwa (Battle) of Dhi Qard or Ghaiba
58 Years
Rabi-ul-Akhar 6 AH August 627 AD
Treaty of Hudaibiyya
58 Years
1 Dhi Qa'd 6 AH 13 March 628 AD
Prohibition of Marriage with non-believers
58 Years
Dhi Qa'd 6 AH March 628 AD
Marriage with Hadrat Habiba, may Allah be pleased with her
58 Years
Dhul-Haj 6 AH April 628 AD
Invitation sent to various rulers to accept Islam
58 Years
1 Muharram 7AH May 628 AD
Ghazwa (Battle) of Khaibar Return of Muslims from Abyssinia. Marriage with Hadrat Safiyya, may Allah be pleased with her. Ghazwa (Battle) of Wadiyul-Qura and Taim.
58 Years
Muharram 7 AH June 628 AD
Performance of Umra (Umratul-Qada) Marriage with Hadrat Maimuna, may Allah be pleased with her
59 Years
Dhi Qa'd 7 AH March 629 AD
Hadrat Khalid bin Walid and Hadrat Umar bin Al-'Aas, may Allah be pleased with both, accept Islam
60 Years
Safar 8 AH June 629 AD
Ghazwa of Muta
60 Years
Jamadi-ul-Awwal 8 AH August 629 AD
Ghazwa (Battle) of Mecca and Fall of Mecca
60 Years
10 Ramadan 8 AH 1 January 630 AD
Ghazwa (Battle) of Hunain (or Autas or Hawazan) and Ghazwa (Battle) of Ta'if
60 Years
Shawwal 8 AH January 630 AD
Arrival in Ja'rana Deputation from Hawazan accepts Islam
60 Years
5 Dhi Qa'd 8 AH 24 February 630 AD
Regular establishment of Department of Zakat (Alms) and Sadaqa (Charity), and appointment of administrative officers
60 Years
Muharram, 9 AH April 630 AD
Deputation from Ghadra accepts Islam
60 Years
Safar 9 AH May 630 AD
Deputation from Balli accepts Islam
61 Years
Rabi-ul-Awwal, 9 AH June 630 AD
Ummul-Muminin Hadrat Mariya, may Allah be pleased with her, gave birth to a son, Hadrat Ibrahim, may Allah be pleased with him
61 Years
Jamadi-ul-Akhar, 9 AH August 630 AD
Ghazwa (Battle) of Tabuk, the last great battle lead by the Holy Prophet, peace be upon him
61 Years
Rajab, 9 AH October 630 AD
Ordinance of Jizya, tax on non-believers seeking protection from Muslims and exemption from military service in defense of the country they were living in as its citizens
61 Years
Rajab 9 AH October 630 AD
Pilgrimage journey of Hadrat Abu Bakr Siddique, may Allah be pleased with him
61 Years
Dhi Qa'd, 9 AH February 631 AD
Hajj (pilgrimage of Ka'ba in Mecca) made Obligatory by Allah Interest is prohibited in Islam
61 Years

Deputation Tai, Hamadan, Bani Asad and Bani Abbas, all accept Islam
61 Years

Deputation from Ghuttan accepts Islam
62 Years
Ramadan, 10 AH 631 AD
Departure from Medina for Mecca for Hajjatul-Wida (Farewell Pilgrimage)
62 Years
25 Dhi Qa'd 10 AH 23 February 632 AD
Entry into Mecca for Hajjatul-Wida (Farewell Pilgrimage)
62 Years
4 Dhul-Haj 10 AH 1 March 632 AD
Hajjatul-Wida, departure for 'Arafat, Farewell Sermon Received the last revelation from Allah
62 Years
Friday 9 Dhul Hajj 10 AH 6 March 632 AD
Return from Mana, Hajjatul-Wida
62 Years
13 Dhul-Hajj 10 AH 10 March 632 AD
Arrival of deputations from Nakha' Last deputation received by the Holy Prophet, peace be upon him
62 Years
15 Muharram 11 AH 11 April 632 AD
Sarya Usama bin Zaid, may Allah be pleased with him, last successful military mission during the Holy Prophet's life
62 Years
28 Safar 11 AH 24 May 632 AD
The Holy Prophet, peace be upon him, falls ill
62 Years
Monday 29 Safar 11 AH 25 May 632 AD
The Holy Prophet, peace be upon him, lead the last Salat four days before his departure from this world
62 Years
Wednesday 8 Rabi-ul-Awwal 11 AH 3 June 632 AD
The Holy Prophet, peace be upon him, offered his last Prayer in congregation in the Mosque lead by Hadrat Abu Bakr, may Allah be pleased with him
63 Years
Monday 12 Rabi-ul-Awwal 11 AH 7 June 632 AD
The Holy Prophet, peace be upon him, passed away
63 Years
Inna lillahe Wa Inna Elaihe Rajioon
Janaza (funeral) Prayer and burial
63 Years
Wednesday 14 Rabi-ul-Awwal 11 AH 9 June 632 AD


Introduction To ISLAM

The literal meaning of Islam is peace; surrender of one’s will i.e. losing oneself for the sake of God and surrendering one’s own pleasure for the pleasure of God. The message of Islam was revealed to the Holy Prophet Muhammad (peace and blessings on him) 1, 400 years ago. It was revealed through angel Gabriel (on whom be peace) and was thus preserved in the Holy Quran. The Holy Quran carries a Divine guarantee of safeguard from interpolation and it claims that it combines the best features of the earlier scriptures.

The prime message of Islam is the Unity of God, that the Creator of the world is One and He alone is worthy of worship and that Muhammad (peace and blessings on him) is His Messenger and Servant. The follower of this belief is thus a Muslim - a Muslim’s other beliefs are: God’s angels, previously revealed Books of God, all the prophets, from Adam to Jesus (peace be on them both), the Day of Judgement and indeed the Decree of God. A Muslim has five main duties to perform, namely; bearing witness to the Unity of God and Muhammad (peace and blessings on him) as His Messenger, observing the prescribed prayer, payment of Zakat, keeping the fasts of Ramadhan and performing the pilgrimage to Mecca.

Islam believes that each person is born pure. The Holy Quran tells us that God has given human beings a choice between good and evil and to seek God’s pleasure through faith, prayer and charity. Islam believes that God created mankind in His image and by imbuing the attributes of God on a human level mankind can attain His nearness. Islam’s main message is to worship God and to treat all God’s creation with kindness and compassion. Rights of parents in old age, orphans and the needy are clearly stated. Women’s rights were safeguarded 1,400 years ago when the rest of the world was in total darkness about emancipation. Islamic teachings encompass every imaginable situation and its rules and principles are truly universal and have stood the test of time.

In Islam virtue does not connote forsaking the bounties of nature that are lawful. On the contrary one is encouraged to lead a healthy, active life with the qualities of kindness, chastity, honesty, mercy, courage patience and politeness. In short, Islam has a perfect and complete code for the guidance of individuals and communities alike. As the entire message of Islam is derived from the Holy Quran and indeed the Sunnah and Hadith (the traditions and practices of the Holy Prophet, peace and blessings on him) it is immutable in the face of change in time and place. It may appear rigid to the casual eye, in actual fact it is most certainly an adaptable way of life regardless of human changes.

Islam teaches that the path to spiritual development is open to all. Any individual who searches the One Creator can seek nearness to God through sincere and earnest worship; it is central to establishing a relationship with the Almighty. This positive message for humanity fills hearts with hope and courage.

At present there are 1.5 billion Muslims worldwide and they form the majority in more than 50 countries of the world. Today Islam is the fastest growing faith in the world - its beautiful message is reaching millions in the far corner of the earth.